Resume

So you’re ‘results driven’ huh?

Trying to fit all that awesomeness into an eye catching, must read, three page resume can be challenging, not to mention finding just the right words to emphasise your brilliance. Agree?

According to The Muse, when trying to craft a resume that stands out, people often get a little too ‘creative’ with their word choices, opting for corporate-sounding buzzwords that they think hiring managers want to hear, rather than simply describing their accomplishments.

The message here? Cut the jargon!

CareerBuilder recently released the results of a survey asking more than 2,000 hiring managers and human resource professionals about their biggest resume word turn-offs (and turn-ons). The results were enlightening indeed.

Seems no one wants to see those over used business buzzwords and clichés – “results-driven,” “team player,” “hard worker.”

 Hiring managers prefer to see proof of such claims through actual achievements. They would rather see strong and simple action verbs such as “achieved,” “improved,” “trained” or “mentored”.

The biggest takeaway? When it comes to the words you choose on your resume, keep it simple. Clearly and accurately describe what you’ve done in the past and it will become obvious to hiring managers why you’re the “best of breed.”

Worst Resume Terms?  (more…)

Krug Champers or Resume self sufficiency?

Beloved readers, as many of you know, my career involves helping transitioning candidates develop effective job search strategies. Given a solid resume is an essential element, stands to reason I’m often asked by friends if I will help them with their resumes too. Now to be honest, it’s kinda the last thing I actually want to be doing in my leisure time…unless your reward involves a crate of Krug Private Cuvée Champers, six nights in the Seychelles, a bevy of gorgeous…wait! No!

Instead, here’s a five-step editing plan that will help you take your own resume from good to pretty damn impressive…you’re welcome! (more…)

Six savvy LinkedIn profile suggestions…

As a career management consultant, an integral part of my work involves coaching candidates to develop and manage their ‘brand’ in the market place. This includes having a sharp, tailored, current Resume. Once completed, I then encourage them to use extracts to create or update their LinkedIn profile to keep the message consistent.

Do you have a profile but not an up to date Resume? Well there might just be an exciting career opportunity waiting around the corner so why wait? Found this excellent article penned by Gerrit Hall (CEO – RezScore) with excellent tips to consider before you go the ‘cut and paste’ route. Verbatim as follows:

Many people think their LinkedIn profiles and their resumes are interchangeable, but you should not send your entire LinkedIn profile into a potential employer and expect to land an interview. While there is the LinkedIn Resume Builder, all that does is reformat your existing profile into a resume — it’s not tailored enough to show the value you could bring to the specific job you’re applying for.

Sure, LinkedIn and your resume have a lot in common. They both include your professional summary, experience, skills, contact information, education and important links. But beyond that, there are plenty of things your LinkedIn profile has that need to stay clear of your resume.

1. All of Your Experience

That job you held in high school is likely not applicable to your career path five years post-graduation, so don’t include it on your resume. The jobs you display on your resume should be relevant to the position you’re applying for, so show potential employers your pertinent accomplishments and results at each position in the bullet points. A resume should be much more focused towards a particular role than your profile. Think of your LinkedIn profile as your “master resume,” and then pull the most relevant information from it to build a resume for each position you apply for.

For example, if you were applying for a job in social media, you’d want to include your internship at a local news station where you helped create a Facebook Page for the company. However, you don’t want to list your high school position where you worked at an after-school care facility.

2. Publications

It’s true that a potential employer might want to see your work portfolio or samples, but including links to everything you’ve ever written on your resume is unnecessary. Keeping track of these on your LinkedIn profile can be helpful, though, particularly when the employer asks for links to your previous work or writing samples on the application. Instead of including links to everything you’ve done, simply provide a link to your LinkedIn profile or online portfolio on your resume (or in your email signature) to allow employers to check it out on their own time.

3. Recommendations

Yes, you need to have references handy for moving forward in the hiring process, but it’s not necessary to take up space on your resume with phrases such as “References available upon request.” Employers expect this, so there is no need to say it — much less include any recommendations. It’s common for employers to ask for these further along in the hiring process anyway, though some may require it on the job application.

4. Interests

While it’s great to let your networking connections see your interests on LinkedIn, a potential employer does not need to know that you enjoy playing basketball if you’re applying for a job in IT. The same goes for your love for cooking if your career path isn’t related to anything culinary. Leave out the talk about your interests in social media -– if the recruiter checks out your profiles, he’ll likely learn about your hobbies and favorite sports teams through the content you’ve shared.

5. Birthday

Age discrimination is a worry among job seekers, whether they’re more experienced or fresh out of college. While it can be helpful for LinkedIn contacts to know when to send you a birthday wish, you do not need to include any personal information, such as your age or birthday, on your resume. Instead, you want to highlight your experience and skills to show the employer why you’re a good fit for the opening, regardless of how old you are — which means providing a compelling (yet concise) resume.

6. Marital Status

Your personal life is your personal life. Whether you’re married or single should not affect your ability to do the job, so don’t give employers more insight into your personal business than necessary. Although job seekers who are used to creating a curriculum vitae (CV) might typically include personal information, such as marital status, place of birth or their spouse’s name, it is not appropriate to include this detailed information on your resume.

Thanks Gerrit!

Gerrit Hall is the CEO and co-founder of RezScore, a free web application that reads, analyzes and grades resumes instantly. Connect with Gerrit and RezScore on Facebook and Twitter.

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